How is the life of a doctor?

I’m looking for answers from doctors, or those who know doctors. You have to go to undergraduate school, then medical school. That is 8 years. Then you have to do 3-5 years of residency and internship. So you are done when you are about 30 years old. Then you have to either start your practice or join a group in a hospital, which is a risk in its own. But at 30 years of age, doing all that residency and work, how do you find a wife? How do you have friends? How do you enjoy your life? Is it true you only start to make money after 5-10 years after becoming a doctor? And how do you spend time with your family after becoming a doctor?

My twin is a doctor as are several of my friends.

There is a stereotype that doctors play a lot of golf, have more disposable income than they know what to do with, and have few cares with little sacrifice.

I suppose there are some specialists or plastic surgeons of the rich and famous who live this life, but I’ve not seen it to be true. To devote a decade of your life to school and no sleep usually means you have a drive to serve people. A doctor’s salary also doesn’t go as far as you’d think with malpractice insurance and paying off that expensive medical school. If you start your own practice, that’s more loans to pay out.

The doctors who have a successful marriage/family were lucky to find those whose situations lent them a LOT of flexibility. My sister wouldn’t have been able to have her quality of family life if her husband didn’t stay at home when her child was born, and if he hadn’t turned down a high paying job that required lots of travel later on.

Between internships, residency, setting up practice, and then working monstrous hours, it was difficult to find the "one". However, they seemed to have no more or no less success than anyone else. Other friends were able to find more time to date in their 20’s, but they found their partners later in life anyway. In some ways, having little time to date left my friends with a stronger idea of who they wanted and allowed them to skip over superficial qualities like flash.

Of course having an MD degree allows more opportunities for financial security than not having any degree at all. But I’ve seen people wonder why my sister and my friends drive shitty old cars, live in modest houses, and drive to their holidays rather than living in chateaus and jetting to Europe. It’s because money is not what it used to be for a lot of people, and they don’t see the 48 hours of sleeplessness, the emotional pain she reveals when she’s not being a professional at the office, and the non-stop harassment she receives from patients or would-be patients 24 hours a day.



  • My twin is a doctor as are several of my friends.

    There is a stereotype that doctors play a lot of golf, have more disposable income than they know what to do with, and have few cares with little sacrifice.

    I suppose there are some specialists or plastic surgeons of the rich and famous who live this life, but I’ve not seen it to be true. To devote a decade of your life to school and no sleep usually means you have a drive to serve people. A doctor’s salary also doesn’t go as far as you’d think with malpractice insurance and paying off that expensive medical school. If you start your own practice, that’s more loans to pay out.

    The doctors who have a successful marriage/family were lucky to find those whose situations lent them a LOT of flexibility. My sister wouldn’t have been able to have her quality of family life if her husband didn’t stay at home when her child was born, and if he hadn’t turned down a high paying job that required lots of travel later on.

    Between internships, residency, setting up practice, and then working monstrous hours, it was difficult to find the "one". However, they seemed to have no more or no less success than anyone else. Other friends were able to find more time to date in their 20’s, but they found their partners later in life anyway. In some ways, having little time to date left my friends with a stronger idea of who they wanted and allowed them to skip over superficial qualities like flash.

    Of course having an MD degree allows more opportunities for financial security than not having any degree at all. But I’ve seen people wonder why my sister and my friends drive shitty old cars, live in modest houses, and drive to their holidays rather than living in chateaus and jetting to Europe. It’s because money is not what it used to be for a lot of people, and they don’t see the 48 hours of sleeplessness, the emotional pain she reveals when she’s not being a professional at the office, and the non-stop harassment she receives from patients or would-be patients 24 hours a day.References :


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