Gaining information about Medical practice, ect.?

I am 15 and have good grades, and want to become a surgeon after high school, and I would like to know where to even begin to just gain some basic and a little more advanced information on medical practice, treatment, causes, just like if I was going to go into a school.. I want something to read in free time but I dont even know where to start, I was thinking a medical dictionary maybe..

First thing’s first: focus on getting into a good university. Once you’ve got that covered, focus on mastering the basic coursework you’ll be taking (biology, chemistry, physics, etc). Without a solid foundation, a lot of the information you seem to want to read will be not stick or make sense. If you find you’re able to get A’s and still have some spare time, spend it volunteering. So many students want to jump ahead to the core material (and I was the exact same way with pharmacy…), but there’s a reason to the madness. Establish a good science foundation upon which to build.



  • First thing’s first: focus on getting into a good university. Once you’ve got that covered, focus on mastering the basic coursework you’ll be taking (biology, chemistry, physics, etc). Without a solid foundation, a lot of the information you seem to want to read will be not stick or make sense. If you find you’re able to get A’s and still have some spare time, spend it volunteering. So many students want to jump ahead to the core material (and I was the exact same way with pharmacy…), but there’s a reason to the madness. Establish a good science foundation upon which to build.References :

  • Don’t read a medical dictionary. That’s a reference book and not good for pleasure in your free time. I’ve got one that I use for reference and I can’t imagine anything more mind-numbingly boring than reading it cover to cover. It also wouldn’t really help you obtain general knowledge since it’s all specific terminology.

    There are about a zillion memoirs by doctors; why not start there? My favorites that I’ve read are "Another Day in the Frontal Lobe" by Katrina Firlik and "Complications" by Atul Gawande.

    Your local Barnes and Noble will have a medical section. Feel free to browse there!

    If you are still feeling ambitious, try a biochemistry textbook or an MCAT prep book.References :


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